Economics @ ITT

Free Trade Explained In An Excellent Comic

Posted in economics, International Economics, Trade by ittecon on June 30, 2015

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) are the latest in a long line of international free trade agreements. But why are they bad for the majority of people and the planet and what are the justifications given by politicians, ecomonists and big corporations for pushing them?

via Free Trade Explained In An Excellent Comic.

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Putting China’s Low Household Consumption in Perspective

Posted in economics, International Economics by ittecon on July 22, 2013

It is widely known that China needs to rebalance its economy to rely more on consumption, but the extent of China’s imbalance between consumption and investment is not fully appreciated.  Comparisons to other emerging markets and countries like Japan, Taiwan, and Korea that pioneered the East Asian growth model show that China’s low levels of consumption are unparalleled.

via Putting China’s Low Household Consumption in Perspective | NewAmerica.net.

 

This is an article from 2011, but it was mentioned by Paul Krugman’s latest post.

Corporate Hunger for Profits Has Devastated American Life—and the World

Posted in economics, environment, externalities, International Economics by ittecon on May 20, 2013

The damage caused by the relentless corporate drive for profits has become more clear in recent years. In the most important areas of American life, devastating changes have occurred:

Health Care: Almost half of the working-age adults in America passed up doctor visits or other medical services because they couldn’t afford to pay. The system hasn’t supported kids, either.

via The 4 Big Ways That Insatiable Corporate Hunger for Profits Has Devastated American Life — and the World Along with It | Alternet.

Controlling China’s Currency

Posted in economics, International Economics by ittecon on May 1, 2013

“It is indisputable that China is over-issuing currency. But the reasons behind China’s massive liquidity growth – and the most effective strategy for controlling it – are less obvious.”

via Controlling China’s Currency by Zhang Monan – Project Syndicate.

Are Cheap Clothes Worth the Cost?

Posted in economics, International Economics by ittecon on April 27, 2013

The sad fact behind the building collapse in Bangladesh in which hundreds died is that it isnt an isolated problem. The story will leave the headlines at the end of this week but on Monday hundreds of thousands of workers will return to factories that are frankly further tragedies waiting to happen, and will keep producing clothes for high street brands.

via Bangladesh collapse: What cost cheap clothes? – CNN.com.

What you never knew about global wealth inequality

Posted in economics, Income Redistribution, International Economics, macroeconomics by ittecon on April 13, 2013

Do you think the United States is the only country that favours the affluent?

I though not. This short video infographic provides some insight.

The Unloved Dollar Standard

Posted in economics, International Economics, macroeconomics by ittecon on January 24, 2013

Since World War II’s end, the US dollar has been used to invoice most global trade, serving as the intermediary currency for clearing international payments among banks and dominating official foreign-exchange reserves. This arrangement has often been criticized, but is there any viable alternative?

via The Unloved Dollar Standard by Ronald McKinnon – Project Syndicate.

US Still Giving Subsidies to Boeing

Posted in economics, International Economics, Policy Issues, Taxation, Trade by ittecon on September 26, 2012

U.S. aircraft giant Boeing is still getting U.S. subsidies despite Washington’s claim to have stopped the handouts, the European Union said on Tuesday in the latest round of the worlds biggest trade dispute.

via EU rejects U.S. claim to have weaned Boeing off subsidies | Reuters.

Eat the Rich

Posted in economics, Income Redistribution, International Economics by ittecon on September 25, 2012

The world’s richest woman, Australian mining tycoon Gina Rinehart, drew international scorn recently after saying that people who are jealous of the wealthy should drink less and work harder.

via Gina Rinehart, world’s richest woman, makes case for $2-a-day pay – latimes.com.

“From Resource Curse to Blessing” by Joseph E. Stiglitz

Posted in economics, International Economics, Taxation, Trade by ittecon on August 6, 2012

On average, resource-rich countries have done even more poorly than countries without resources. They have grown more slowly, and with greater inequality – just the opposite of what one would expect.

via “From Resource Curse to Blessing” by Joseph E. Stiglitz | Project Syndicate.